Alice in Zombieland, Gena Showalter

I know we’re only two days away from a three-day long weekend, but the last week has been a real slog of post vacation blues. Usually this is a condition I suffer, at most, a day or so, but I have not been able to let go this time. I crave more sun! More family time! More hours to lazily read zombie novels while the waves crash at my feet!

Yes, while on vacation, I finished the two books I’d brought (unheard of!) and ended up downloading one at random from my Amazon wish list. As is the case with many of the titles collected there, I couldn’t remember where I had tagged it from or what it was about; all that mattered was that it looked like just the right level of popcorn fiction for the occasion at hand. Judging by the quick three-day turn around (read exclusively on beaches or while waiting for my turn to scrub sunscreen-cemented sand off), it was the right choice.

Now, this is not one of those books I’d blithely recommend to just anyone. First of all, it has a teen romance element I was neither expecting nor particularly enamored with. Secondly, it’s about zombies. Now, personally, I love a good zombie book. While I often find television and movie depictions of the genre too intense, I find the right novel, laced with a healthy dose of humor, to be intriguing. (For example, I’m more of a Shaun of the Dead fan than The Walking Dead.)

It’s not an area of fiction where I’ve generally found much traction. While vampires, werewolves, and otherworldly spirits have long dominated the shelves, zombies seem to continuously slip by on the reader popularity scale. I think I’ve only reviewed one other even remotely similar title here, and that was a few years back now. I’m certain some of you are genre aficionados and will be able to point me toward some great titles, but it still stands that as far as monster fiction goes, the pickings are rather slim.

It was with great joy, then, that I discovered Alice. Although the character is flawed in some very realistic adolescent ways, the writing was never less than compelling. The pacing was perfect for such a story, and even when I rolled my eyes at descriptions of muscle-bound teenage delinquent zombie hunters, I was also completely hooked. The kids Showalter was describing – burn outs and troublemakers and victims of great tragedies – did seem like the perfect army to fight the undead. They had that ideal combination of ridiculous unflagging energy and young bones that could take brutal beatings and realistically recover in a few days or weeks.

The end result was a guilty pleasure that practically had “vacation reading” stamped on the cover. I didn’t even have to break a sweat to finish this before we flew home, and it was the perfect companion to that brief bit of summer I glimpsed during this interminable winter.

 

For more about Gena Showalter and the White Rabbit Chronicles, head here.

17 thoughts on “Alice in Zombieland, Gena Showalter

    1. Do you have any good recommendations? I agree that this wasn’t my favorite (mainly, I found the romance off-putting – not because I don’t like romance, but this particular romance was just…ugh…), but I did like some of the elements with her father (her odd childhood) and the presentation of the zombies themselves.

      1. Not sure what you’ve read, but here are my faves.

        Steampunk: Cherie Priest’s Boneshaker.
        Tech: Mira Grant’s Feed.
        Funny: Diana Rowland’s My Life as a White Trash Zombie.
        Stupid Funny: Christopher Moore’s The Stupidest Angel.
        Romantic: Jesse Petersen’s Married with Zombies.
        Awesome short stories: Holly Black’s Zombies vs. Unicorns.
        Superhero: Peter Cline’s Ex-Heroes.
        Bookish: Madeleine Roux’s Allison Hewitt is trapped.

  1. Not a book I would have thought to pick up before but interesting review. I am certainly more inclined to give the zombies a go after reading Boneshaker, as mentioned above, would totally recommend it. Its also a good introduction to the steampunk genre for those who are uninitiated!

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